Tag Archives: Michigan Farmers Markets

Are There Too Many Farmers Markets? Post Two

I posted my take on a NYT article, Are There too Many Farmers Markets

Below are follow up comments via email from Michigan Farmers and/or Farmers Market Managers.

Here are a few of my own ideas to get more people into Farmers Markets instead of the super market.

1) Shuttles: Work with big institutions like Hospitals, Colleges, Large Business Campuses, Churches Etc and offer a schedule shuttle service and/or encourage them to schedule a weekly shuttle using their own transportation.

2) Weekly Promotional Flyers/Emails: Have vendors give a heads up with what will be ready next week including prices. The super markets have weekly flyers all of the time and it works great to bring people into the store for certain things.

3) Offer Debit Card Wooden Token Service: I have had many shoppers run out of cash by the time they come to my booth. Offering an ATM with tokens that can only be spent at the market (or even every market in the state) may keep them shopping and coming back to spend their tokens.

4) Shopping Buddy Program: I just thought this one up. The thought is that instead of shuttling people to the market, one or a few people can go to the market each week and shop for a bunch of people at once. People can take turns shopping/delivering the groceries.

Think of say two Church members shopping for say themselves and 10 others or Student Co-Housing members taking turns getting food for the house.

The issue with Farmers Markets is that they are set times unlike the super market and if you are working or busy on those times you are out of luck even if you really want farmers market produce. This can solve for that. It also allows one person to shop on a bad weather days for a group.

Rain can be a deal breaker for shoppers, but with this shopping buddy idea, the person still shows up at the market and shops because they are responsible for the group even if their turn was a rain day.

5) Work with Party Planners/Caterers: A few weeks ago, a shopper was buying up the market for a large party she was hosting for I think 50 people. Her bags were packed and I thought, “We can use more people like her at the market.”

6) Participate in food assistance programs: The Westside has been very active in supporting food assistance programs like EBT, Double up Food Bucks, Prescription for Health and others.

7) Get more people cooking: This is the most challenging. The people who come to the market know what to do with an ear of corn, a bunch of beets, a head of broccoli and a create of tomatoes. We need more of these people (home cooks) if we want more customers at Farmers Markets. Food demos and recipes suggestion can go a long way.
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Farmer/Vender/Market Managers Comments:

I have thought about this question for the last few years.  I do a market in Northern part of Michigan,  The market has been going on for 20= years.  Well, about 5-6 years ago, the group that was in charge of the market decided they didn’t need the funds from the market and they couldn’t get any one to take over.  Having said this, we now are run in part by a Farmers Market board, which has 5 business 2 farmers from our market, 1 crafter from our market, and 1 local resident who asked to be on the board.

One of the things I have noticed in the last 5 years, it is not so much the number of markets that are around.  But, the fact that if the vendors are not from our local area.  Then  they should be bringing in some customers from where they are from.

Yes our market is one of the few who allow crafts, but, our market has grown (what I think) so large that even if the people in the area came and made purchased at the market they only have so much money to spend.  So, if you have alot of vendors from other area, then they should be bring customers with them.  I’m not saying that they cannot come to sell their items at the market.  But, you should ask that they at east bring some new customer with them.   Our market runs from 8am – 12 noon, which, if you want the freshest produces, meat, eggs, breads, that you have to get to the market early.

I have told the board that the that the products we sell which ARE ALL HANDMADE ITEMS, and they are also jury into the market, so we have to tell them what we are selling, what the product is, how it is made, the materials are used to make the item, and how the item is used.  This process in its self has caused some problems for the crafters.  It has not hurt the sales of the farmers, but our market has grow to twice to four times what it was when I first started going to the market.  I do understand that you want to have a variety of items at the market, and that compatition is a good thing for everyone, but how much is too much.

We have a 30 miles radius for vendors of our items, unless you have a special item then you can sell at the market.  When we first started doing this market, we would make $100+ on a Wednesday and then $200-300, on a Saturday.  Now we are lucky if we make $200 total for both days.

I do feel there are too many markets, out there, and now there is really no one really watching to make sure that things are being done correctly, first and fore most for the consumer, and then for the vendor.
There is no easy answer to this, and I’m sure there are going to be as many who think we need more market, and the ones who think we have too many.  The best thing you can do for your market, is be sure people know about you, word of mouth is the best advertising there is.  And if need have some type of event to get people to stop, once you get them to stop, it will be natural for them to stop on the way home, to work, ect.

I hope this makes things a bit clearer for you.  I could talk your ear off about Farmers Market, but, if you have a good product, people will come and get it.

Susan Oelke
Vanderbilt, MI
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Hi,
I believe there are too many farmers markets. It has opened wider the door to reselling of farm produce and fruits from whatever source. While the seller might be “local”, can we say the same for the produce and fruit?
Oakland County Market.

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Well, overall, I am seeing some decline in numbers of buyers.  Possible causes – we have some changes each year in vendors – we do only produce and value added (baked goods, jams, syrup, wool).
We have 3 markets within 7 miles and about 8 more within the county, two more started this year.  We also have a CSA..
Answers? None specific, but I know having live musicians has helped.  Creating a “glad to see you” street party atmosphere helped.  Having a coffeeshop with great coffee across the street, and free parking, helped. The cottage food bill helped.   What has given us the kick in the pants was the economy and a little bit of greed on part of marketers.   I had people going to a different market because his quarts of tomatoes were $3 instead of $4.  Market was 7 miles away (okay, so I know they spen t that dollar on gas).
But yes, people will buy.  They’re just buying less, on a budget.  The buying is down, but there is a constant flow.  People are trying new stuff (sprouts), flowers, herbs.  We have, in past years, given away recipes.  Everyone will give growing advice.
As a volunteer manager, I have done this 7 years.  We try very hard to have farm grown and farmer-direct (ie.blueberries) and not auction produce.  I had someone say our produce was more expensive than Horrock’s.  Well, yes, we don’t get it dropped off at the doorstep.  Somebody has to go weed! Hmm, guess I gotta go do that this morning!
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good morning,

     my name is Melissa Gavin of gavin orchards- coopersville, michigan..the article mentions too many farmer’s markets, i see that as only part of the problem.

The explosion of farmer’s markets has really at some level put both the consumer, and the farmers at risk.

Right now in our community at most of the farmers markets i attend, it is about how many vendors they can get. no matter what they are selling , or if they even grew it. and i bet most vendors don’t even know where the commodities they are selling were grown. if in fact even in  michigan. i feel this is a huge risk to the consumer. what about food safety? how are these vendors keeping thier product cool? do they know the right temperture each one should be at to maintain quality and safety!..

So what i am saying is too many markets? not real sure on that answer, i do believe it is a great venue for the farmer to sell thier products straight to the consumer, but when a farmer has to sell most of it to wholesale distributors who then sells them to a person(vendor-reseller) to be sold at local farmer’s markets for a quick buck, i dont feel that is fair..especially when they are attending the same markets you attend and then are undercuting you..because they have no overhead or risk at stake. because they are not going to be held liable for the product and it’s safety..like the farmer is.. with food safety audits, liability insurance, taxes and for that matter a business liscence. and a recall! wich by them not having the equiptment or knowledge of keeping food safe, is a likely senerio..

I am not mad, i am just very frustrated. i feel all these farmer’s market and thier managers need to re-evaluate, what is important to thier communities. i am hoping it is food safety.
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I have seen this debate before and it is an interesting one. Can there be too many markets in a area? For sure, but more and more markets seem like they can only be good for the movement. We are into our second year as a market and at least 90% of our customers rarely, if ever went to another market. Have we taken customers from other markets? Yes, we have, but I think it’s putting pressure on other markets to do what we do: music, demos and special days.

The Westside Market has for sure put pressure on the old standby, the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, and that is a good thing. Adding an evening may hurt Westside, but I doubt it. Less gas to get to a market can be part of the equation.
The key thing about markets, is that whatever food business we do, we are statistically insignificant. If we steal 1/10 of 1% from the grocery stores, then we should look at expanding our base and get up to 1/5 (I have no idea what the real numbers are). To act like there are a limited number of market customers is the big mistake. To make it a goal to convert new customers to the movement is what’s important here. Whole Foods Market and CSAs hurt farm markets too, but is that to say that we should discourage either one of those, when they are both an excellent thing?
We are a small market and we have 250-300 people at our Saturday market, and I say to myself every week, how can we grow that number with new customers? The food is good, the vendors are nice, the thing is fun. Who wouldn’t want to come? Yes, we have 6-8,000 homes within 20 minutes, yet the local Kroger is doing our yearly gross in a couple of hours. I’m sure some would says this is not important, but I want to know how markets can be more than a blip in the economy?
I have one small farm that travels to 5 markets a week. With all that gas, it may negate the benefits of being local at all. There are detractors that say farmers like this uses more energy than transporting the same amount all the way from Florida or California. This is a whole different debate, but should be considered in the debate of too many markets too.
I have another vendor that stopped going to Eastern Market because with our market and their new farm stand, they don’t have to travel as far to sell all their product. This is the ideal situation, and the impact is so much better all around.
Market Managers should be asking themselves every week how they can get more customers to the market. Vendors and farmers should be asking their customers to tell their friends about what makes their market so good, so markets can make a bigger dent in the food system. Farms are businesses. Markets are businesses too (though non-profit) and the free market always has a way of working things out the way they need to be.
Sean McClellan
Dundee Farmers Market.
(734) 529-2688

Are There too Many Farmers Markets?

This is a copy of a letter I sent to the Michigan Farmers Market Listserv. I will post updates with feedback from vendors/market managers.

There was an article in todays Sunday New York Times:
As Farmers’ Markets Go Mainstream, Some Fear a Glut.

The gist was that there are too many farmers markets and it is making it harder for farmers.
Selected Pieces From the Article: By 
Nationwide, the number of farmers’ markets has jumped to 7,175 as of Aug. 5; of those, 1,043 were established this year, according to the federal Agriculture Department. In 2005, there were 4,093 markets across the country.

Rick Wysk, who spent the morning pulling beets out of the eight acres he tills at River Bend Farm in nearby Hadley, says his business at farmers’ markets is half what it was five years ago.

“You have a certain amount of demand, and the more you spread out the demand, you’re making less,” said Mr. Wysk, who has been selling at markets for 13 years. He believes his business is further hurt by additional markets that opened this year in Northampton and Springfield.

“We’re Western Mass. We’re not New York City. We’re not Boston,” Mr. Wysk said. “We’ve got people, but not the population in the bigger markets.”

In New York, farmers’ markets in some parts of the state have started to “cannibalize each other’s customer base,” said Diane Eggert, the executive director of the Farmers’ Market Federation of New York. The organization has started distributing feasibility surveys to communities that want to open markets so they can figure out if the location has the farmer and customer base necessary to survive, Ms. Eggert said.

Jeff Cole, the executive director of Massachusetts Federation of Farmers Markets, said the organization had urged groups not to open new markets near thriving, existing ones, but could not order them not to because of state law. In one instance, a new market opened less than two miles from another, Mr. Cole said. Sales at the first one dropped by more than 30 percent.

Other communities do not have enough farmers to keep up with all the new markets that are opening, Ms. Miller said. According to federal agriculture officials, there are approximately 2.2 million farms nationwide; in 2006 there were 2.09 million.

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So is this happening in Michigan and in Ann Arbor where I sell at the Westside Market?


The Westside is the new kid on the block starting in 2005. 

The Yspi Farmers Market is also relatively new comer too (2006), but Yspi seems to far enough away to affect Ann Arbor and Ypsi needs all the fresh food they can get because they’re bordering on being in a food desert.

Last year was my first year at the Westside. I am a super small farmer (offering sprouts and baked goods), more of a backyard grower and I was grateful to get into the Westside market because the Ann Arbor downtown Farmers Market was more expensive, was hard to get into and a farmer was already selling sprouts there. 

The Westside was the only night market in town, which I felt gave us an advantage with customers who wanted to shop after work. We also have easy shopping mall parking unlike downtown, which can get so crowded on Saturdays that I some times leave without shopping because it is impossible to park.

(Maybe they can run shuttles on Sat????)

This changed this year when the Downtown Market decided to extend their Wednesday day hours to include nights.

I cannot say how this new Wednesday night market has change the Westside business. 

I am not the only Westside vendor to speculate about the impact of the Wednesday Night Market. 

Maybe the Wednesday night market will grow to swallow up the Westside for good or vise versa. 

Maybe we can both reach a happy medium. 

Or maybe we will both dilute each others customer base and poach each others vendors making Ann Arbor night markets an all around loss.

Or maybe another Thursday night market will pop up next year a few miles away?

It does seem like their have been fewer people at the Westside this year, but I do not have the numbers. If our numbers are shrinking, I cannot say if the recession is a factor or a saturated market place.

So, are there too many Farmers Markets?

Are we spreading ourselves too thin and forcing farmers to have to go to 2-3 markets instead of one to make the same sales or half of their sales at the one market?

If there are too many Farmers Markets, it could be a good thing. I figure that Farmers Markets need to start poaching customers from super markets instead of from each other. Think of all of the Kroger shoppers who buy from their organic food section. They can be shopping at the farmers market instead

If there are too many markets, we need more customers all around to support them, which is the challenge for market managers, farmers/vendors and the go green/buy local media machine and food movement.

I think that there is a perception that the farmers market is too expensive, which is entirely untrue. Dollar for dollar, I have found the farmers markets are competitive on price if not less expensive with Whole Foods, and organic/natural sections in super markets for comparable produce. I know my prices are on average or lower than area super markets for organic produce.

With that said, it seems that Farmers’ Markets are experiencing growing pains.

Brian Steinberg
Inchworm Farms
Ann Arbor, MI

Growers vs Resellers at Farmers Market

There has been an ongoing debate on the Michigan Farmers Market Association Listserv about what type of vendor should be allowed at a Farmers Market.

Among the issues discussed are whether to allow vendors from out of state and whether to allow resellers, people who do not grow their own produce/meat/cheese/artisan products etc. to sell at the market.

I have provided a small sample of the responses to this passionate debate below.

How do I weigh in on the subject?

I have no problem with vendors coming in from bordering states. The Ohio border is closer for example than many towns in Michigan with farmers who might come to sell at an Ann Arbor Farmers Market.

As some will know, I sell microgreens at the Westside Farmers Market. I grow them in a small backyard garden and I am pretty sure that the Westside only allows grower/producers to sell there. I like the policy.

By contrast, I have been to markets with vendors who sold out of the region fruits like grapefruit at their booth. The fruit was no even organic, and I felt that it did not fit in at the market. What made the grapefruit at a farmers market any different from buy it at the grocery store?

I felt if too many of the vendors were resellers it would make customers question the difference between a farmers market and the produce section of a chain grocery store.

So where do I stand on the reseller question?

Ideally, I think that a farmers market should strive to try to have only growers/producers.

Customers who come to a farmers market assume that they are buying from the farmer and come to the market in part to by local.

Buy locally and Meet Your Farmer/Artisan is a huge marketing slogan for Farmers Market and having too many resellers may weaken a Farmers Market Brand.

It may be hard to find the variety of farmers and artisans to make a well rounded market with a grower/producer only policy, but I feel that sticking by that policy will support new upstart local growers (like myself) who will be vendors at your Farmers Market.

Customers will appreciate it and the Market would have created a great Brand.

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Fay,

Yes there is reason!!  I live 2 miles from the INDIANA state line and in our market we have some growers that live on the other side of the line.   Yes we do know they grow the produce but they are from out of the state making there produce from another state.  My sister brings here sweet corn and that is 7 miles from our market in Indiana, what you are saying is we should cut our market in half because we should not have out of state produce.  In the reverse I should not be able to sell in the markets in Indiana we sell in because we are out of the state?  We feel that the local is within 50 miles but our venders are with in 30 miles.

We understand local very well but every market is to understand the location of what you are talking before blanket NO reason to have produce coming from out of state.

Dana

Three Oaks Farmers Market


Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2011 11:42:53 -0500
From: bigskyfarm@GMAIL.COM
Subject: Re: growers vs resellers at a market
To: FARMMKTMI@LIST.MSU.EDU

There is absolutely NO reason for markets to have any produce coming from out of state, much less out of the country!!!!  I do feel that some reciprocity is helpful, however, among farmers with different types of produce, limited growing seasons, limited time to attend markets. Farmers markets are hard work, as we all know!  As more communities have started small neighborhood markets it becomes impossible to attend so many of them, and this invites fraud/reselling/misrepresentation.  Co-op selling is a good idea and helpful to all.  I agree that the early and late season present “volume” issues for farmers, but there are a lot of ways to plan for that and they should plan accordingly with other offerings of their own or from local collaborators. Storage crops??????

BUT the key, as Chris says, is transparency.  In my view the basics indicated by Chris are the sign of a healthy market of the type that the people really want, and anything else undermines the credibility of the entire system.  I recently found garlic from China at one of the roadside produce stands–which the average person assumes means local produce, but of course we know differently…. The recent televised scandal in Oakland county, in which a grower represented his produce as “pesticide free”, sustainably grown, etc. but was filmed purchasing it at the Eastern Mkt. has sent shock waves through our farmers market and, more importantly, organic growers communities.  ALL farmers are hurt by those who cut corners or misrepresent their produce !!!!!!!!

Unless our markets represent local, fresh produce there is no reason for people to shop there when the grocery store may be cheaper or more convenient.  HIGH STANDARDS, TRANSPARENCY are what I look for when I think about where I want to sell my produce and where I want to buy it!

Fay Hansen

On Sat, Jan 22, 2011 at 1:17 PM, Christopher Bedford <chrisbedford@charter.net> wrote: 

Stacie, 

You have raised a CORE issue that troubles many farmers’ markets and their managers.
At many West Michigan farmers markets, resellers go to a wholesale fruit/vegetable market and buy their produce to resell at the
farmers’ market. Many of this resellers simply double the wholesale price and sit there as if the produce was their own.
Some farmers buy in the wholesale market for early and late in the season, selling their own produce during peak production periods.
And there are many variations in between. So what should you do?
I believe the key concept here is TRANSPARENCY.
Consumers have a right to know what they are buying.
In my opinion, every vendor at a farmers’ market should be required to publicly display the following information.
1. Where the various fruits and vegetables were grown? Local? From some other place?
2. How were they grown? Were pesticides and herbicides used? If so, which ones?
3. When were they picked? (Michael Hamm likes to point out, the time of harvest is one of the critical elements in nutritional content.)
These three pieces of information make the reseller vs. grower controversy mute.
Resellers simply label their produce as such. If their lettuce was harvested three weeks ago in Mexico, they should reveal this information.
Transparency means everyone competes on a level playing field, building trust with customers and supporting ethical behavior in food production.
Unfortunately, there is strong resistance to all three transparency requirements.
I resigned from the Board of the Michigan Farmers Market Association over this issue.
Right now, we, as a state, permit some vendors, often big anchor vendors at farmers’ markets, to blatantly misrepresent or hide this information.
This is neither sustainable, ethical, nor economically smart.
The local food revolution must be based on integrity and transparency.
Let McDonalds call their McNuggets chicken even though half the ingredients are not chicken.
We have to be better than that.
With TRANSPARENCY and honest labeling, farmers are free to do anything they chose.
And the consumers’ rights are protected in the process.
Chris Bedford
On Jan 22, 2011, at 12:40 PM, Douglas Dubin wrote:
We are facing a conflict at our farmers market between growers and resellers.  Would like to know how people are dealing with this.  More importantly, looking for research to either show that both can be or not be supported at one market.  Thanks! 

Stacie Dubin
Co- market manager/farmer

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Christopher Bedford
Filmmaker-Writer-Organizer
Center for Economic Security
#6543 Hancock Road
Montague, MI 49437
231-893-3937