Tag Archives: Oyster Mushrooms

Oyster Mushroom Log Update

2nd year with full harvest

I took a mushroom workshop about this time 2 years ago where I learned about making mushroom logs. I purchased this log (shown above) that I made and I have been eagerly watching its progress.

The mushroom are a little past when I would have like to have harvested them, but they look great. I count nine large mushrooms growing for the log.

If only I had 100 more logs growing, like I hoped to have started this year, but I could not find logs anywhere, despite a major search.

Oyster Mushroom Michigan 2011 growing from a long

Related post

https://lastoneeating.wordpress.com/2010/05/29/mushroom-growing-at-home-update/

https://lastoneeating.wordpress.com/2011/05/03/michigan-morels-2011/

https://lastoneeating.wordpress.com/2010/10/10/wine-cap-mushrooms-at-the-westside-farmers-market-2011/

https://lastoneeating.wordpress.com/2011/08/19/toilet-paper-mushrooms-blue-oyster/

Toilet Paper Mushrooms: Blue Oyster

Ann Arbor FoodSome may note my minor obsession with growing mushrooms this year. My plan was to hit the ground running with my Wine Cap mushroom that I planted last Oct.

My wine caps have yet to pop up, but I am still hopeful for a fruiting this year in a few weeks. They can take up to 18 months to fruit, so if they do not come up soon it will look like I will have to wait over winter.

The next idea was to get some Shitake logs started, but it was/is next to impossible to find fresh cut oak logs. Believe me I tried.

Don’t be surprised if you hear a chain saw going in the middle of the night in your yard to see mushroom obsessed vandals in a desperate attempt to score a log or two.

So with my wine caps in wait-and-see mode and no go on logs, I set my sights on Oyster mushrooms.

Oysters can be grown on a variety of substrates including pasteurized wheat straw, coffee grounds, newspaper and I even seen I class teaching mushrooms growing on old phone books.

And then there are Toilet Paper mushrooms.

Ann Arbor Food

Toilet Paper mushrooms are by far the easiest ways to get started with growing mushrooms.

I purchase some spore from Chris of Easy Grow Mushrooms, and ordered some special Toilet Paper mushroom  growing bags that have a mess air vent on the top.Trader Joes had the best deal on Chlorine-free Toilet Paper.

Step by Step Instruction

The idea was to grown mushrooms for sale at my booth at The Westside Farmers Market.

They worked like a charm. I got mushroom on 3 weeks with most fruit around the same time.

Chris at Easy Grow said that Toilet Paper Oyster mushrooms tend to be on the same side because the small amount of substrate compared to a good size log, or several gallon bag of straw/coffee grounds.

He was right and I figured that I would not yield enough mushrooms off of my 18-20 rolls of toilet paper to have enough mushrooms for sale.

Each roll yields around 1-2 ounces of mushrooms per fruiting.

My mushrooms looked great and were ready to harvest, so on a lark I figured that I would bring a few to the market to show off.

Ann Arbor Food

The response was huge. People gravitated toward these alien looking things. The toilet paper after three weeks gets so morphed by the mushroom spore that it is hard to recognize. Form a distance, people thought it was a hunk of soft cheese.

They were amazed when I said it was toilet paper.

I ended up selling/trading them as mini-mushroom kits.

They make for a fun grow project for kids and would-be mushroom growing enthusiasts.

I will have more next week at the Westside Farmers Market.

Growing Mushrooms at Home: Take two

There are a few ways to grow mushrooms at home. The first is by finding a fresh hardwood log, drilling holes, and hammering inoculated plugs into the holes, and covering with wax. Another other way is to use the method shown here. Straw has been boiled (distilled), place in a bag, and then it is inoculated with a mushroom spore. In this case oyster mushrooms. Holes are poked into the bag, so mushrooms can grow through.

I did not go through this process myself. I purchased this from a vendor at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market. The instructions were to put it inside in a dark area like in the basement, and make sure to keep it moist. This advise was well in good, but the house I live in has all wood floors, and I a lot of wood furniture. And for anyone who has tried to grow mushroom in the house, there is always the possibility that the mushrooms will decide to plant themselves on other carbon IE wood sources. So I am growing mine in a plastic tub in the garage. The vendor told me that I should get some mushrooms in a few weeks, and up to 3 more harvests. Sounds good to me. The leftover straw and mushrooms spore makes great compost.

I will post updates in the weeks to come.

related Posts:

https://lastoneeating.wordpress.com/2009/10/11/growing-mushroom-at-home-oyster-shiitake-and-wine-cap/