Tag Archives: Tomukun Ann Arbor

Ramen Recipes

Ann Arbor FoodRamen noodles are the quintessential food for college students on a budget. They are cheap, easy to make, and taste good. But more than a simple reheated brick of dry noodles in a salty flavor-packet broth, the humble instant ramen package can be transformed into even betters eats with a little extra effort.

Many in the US only know ramen as cheap noodles, but in Japan ramen making is an art form. The art of ramen is illustrated beautifully in the classic japanese foodie movie Tampopo (click here to see a youtube click). Tampopo is the Rocky of Japanese noodles making movies.

It humorously shows one woman’s struggles to create the best ramen noodles to save her fledgling noodle shop. In Rocky training montage style, she goes through the ropes of ramen making from keeping the noodle cooking water at a boil, to creating the best broth and slicing pork to the right thickness. Our hero wins the day in the end when her coach silently finishes a bowl of her ramen noodles and slurps the last drop of broth with pleasure.

Ramen houses have started popping up in cities around the country including the recently opened Tomukun on Liberty St. in Ann Arbor.

When making ramen at home, forget the flavor packet and make a broth from the boxed chicken or vegetable stocks. The Swanson brand is rated highest by America’s Test Kitchen on PBS and found in most grocers.

To the stock, add soy sauce, grated ginger and some lime or rice vinegar and finish it with a splash of chili oil for some heat. Simmer in chicken breast, shrimp, thin cuts of lean beef, ham and even scrabble eggs to make a heartier soup. Carrots, sliced mushrooms, peas, onions and radishes make good vegetable additions.

Master Broth recipe: Make one bowl of soup

1 cup of chicken or vegetable stock
1/3 cup of water
1 tablespoon of soy sauce
1 tablespoon of lime juice or rice vinegar
½ inch piece of fresh ginger, grated and squeezed into broth
½ teaspoon of honey or sugar
chili oil (optional)

Add all of the ingredients and heat to a simmer. Add one package of cooked ramen noodles.

Ham and Eggs: The Hangover
1 package of cooked ramen noodles
1 master broth recipe
1-2 eggs, scrabbled
few pieces of cold cut ham, sliced into strips
hot chili oil (optional)
chopped scallion, parsley, or cilantro for garnish

Warm the broth and add the scrabbled eggs, ham and scallion

Vietnamese PHO Ramen

1 package of cooked ramen noodles
1 master broth recipe
3 slices of roast beef, sliced into strips
¼ cup of mung bean sprouts
Juice of ½ a lime
cilantro, purple basil
Sriracha hot sauce

To the cooked noodles and broth, add the sliced beef, mung beans, lime juice, cilantro, basil and sriracha hot sauce to taste.

Chicken, mushroom and peas

1 package of cooked ramen noodles
1 master broth recipe
4 ounces of chicken breast, diced
¼ cup of peas
½ cup of sliced mushrooms
parsley

To the broth, add the raw chicken breast and simmer till fully cooked. Simmer the mushrooms and peas for a few minutes. Pour over cooked noodles in a bowl. Garnish with parsley.

Thai Coconut Curry Ramen

2 packages of cooked ramen noodles
1 master broth recipe
1 cup of coconut milk
4-6 ounce of chicken breast, diced or 6 large shrimp
2 tablespoon of fish sauce
juice of 1 lime
¼ cup of mushrooms sliced
½ teaspoon thai curry paste
chopped scallion and cilantro

Cook the noodle and set aside. To the master broth, add the coconut milk, fish sauce, and lime juice. Bring to a simmer and add the chicken. Simmer for a few minutes and add the sliced mushrooms. Place the curry paste in a small bowl with some of the soup broth and mix with a spoon until the paste and the broth are combined. Add to the soup.

Divide the noodles into two bowls. Pour the soup over the noodles. Garnish with scallion and cilantro. Add more lime if desired.

Tomukun Noodles in Ann Arbor: PHO

Ann Arbor Food

Tomukun is one of Ann Arbor’s newest restaurants. They specialize in moderately priced noodle dishes like ramen, pho, soba, and udon. They also offer rice dishes and a nice assortment of appetizers like pork buns, which come more open faced than the traditional cooked inside a bun.

The verdict.

The place was great. I ordered the deluxe pho and Emily had the spicy seafood ramen. Good Pho is hard to find. I thought theirs was worthy. Was it the best? The Pho I had out in Oregon kicked-ass, so I will not go on the record saying it was the best I ever had, but it was the best in town and I plan to make Tomukun my haunt for my local Pho fix.

What you want to see with Pho is fixings like lime, sprouts, hot peppers, sweet and hot sauce and fresh basil. Tomukun provided those fixings. Any place that cheaps out and does not provide them with your Pho is not worth returning too. (I will not say who you are…other so called Pho places in town…but they know)

What made this Pho a little different at Tomukun is the broth, which was pork not beef. I liked it. They also put slices of pork belly in the Pho Deluxe, which I never had before. I am not a big fan of intestines, which are common in Pho, so the addition of pork belly was welcomed.

At $11 is was on the pricy side for Pho, which usually runs about $7 in the out of the way places in Portland. But I figure you pay more to eat in downtown Ann Arbor.

Click here to see the Menu